Geological Society Bicentenary_logo_rev_135.jpg

Working Party Matters


Membership | Terms of Reference | Task Allocation | Intranet | Geohazard Communication | Links |

 

Landslides & Slope Instability


Engineering Geologists | Planners & Developers | Finance & Insurance | Member of the Public

 

Subsidence & Collapse Hazard


Engineering Geologists | Planners & Developers | Finance & Insurance | Member of the Public

 

Seismic Hazard


Engineering Geologists | Planners & Developers | Finance & Insurance | Member of the Public

 

Flood Hazard


Engineering Geologists | Planners & Developers | Finance & Insurance | Member of the Public

 

Tsunami Hazard


Engineering Geologists | Planners & Developers | Finance & Insurance | Member of the Public

 

Volcanic Hazard


Engineering Geologists | Planners & Developers | Finance & Insurance | Member of the Public

 

Gas Hazard


Engineering Geologists | Planners & Developers | Finance & Insurance | Member of the Public

 

Fault Reactivation Hazard


Engineering Geologists | Planners & Developers | Finance & Insurance | Member of the Public

Subsidence & Collapse Geohazards: Chalk & Flint Mining

Subsidence Index | Chalk Mining Index | Diagnostic Characteristics | Geographic Occurrence | Investigation & Mitigation | Key Contacts & Expert Advice | Photo Gallery | Essential References & Further Reading | Definitions & Glossary |

Underground mining within the Chalk outcrop of southern and eastern England has taken place over a long time span. Some of the earliest mine workings date from the Neolithic period. The expiry of mining activity appears to have occurred during the early 1900s. There are a wide variety of mining styles that were created for a range of purposes. The scale of mining may differ according to purpose, comprising for example a single small-scale mine working covering an area of <100m , expanding up to larger scale workings covering an area of say 10,000m or more.

 

Many of the mine workings remained open on abandonment, with just their shaft or adit entrances infilled and sealed. The locations of abandoned mines are not well recorded and so they pose a serious ground subsidence hazard. As urban development extends outwards around the historical centres of towns and cities, construction activities are revealing more mines each year as collapse of the ground occurs.

 

Some examples of chalk mines are shown below:

 

Hanover chalk mine, Reading.  (Image Source: Peter Brett Associates)                                   

              

         

Chalk mine, Kintbury. (Image Source: Peter Brett Associates)   

 

Subsidence Index | Chalk Mining Index | Diagnostic Characteristics | Geographic Occurrence | Investigation & Mitigation | Key Contacts & Expert Advice | Photo Gallery | Essential References & Further Reading | Definitions & Glossary |

 


Engineering Group Working Party on Geological Hazards